An OnlyFans creator has revealed she makes $60,000 a month on the platform as she estimated that ’95 per cent’ of the content on the site is explicit

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An OnlyFans creator has revealed she makes $60,000 a month on the platform as she estimated that ’95 per cent’ of the content on the site is explicit.

Leah Schrager, who performs under the name Ona Artist, spoke to the BBC‘s Evan Davis on Radio 4’s PM programme on Wednesday after OnlyFans dropped plans to ban sexually explicit photographs and videos on its platform later this year.

Mr Davis expressed his astonishment when the performer revealed how much she earns on the site during a conversation about the U-turn. 

‘I make right now $60,000 [£43,600] a month,’ she said, prompting the presenter to loudly exclaim ‘what?!’

She also guessed that ‘at least 95 per cent’ of the content on OnlyFans is explicit and porn believes the firm ‘would not have had any business’ if they had pressed ahead with the ban. 

A number of celebrities, musicians and comedians also use the site for non-sexual content 

OnlyFans creator Leah Schrager, who performs under the name Ona Artist, has revealed she makes $60,000 a month on the platform as she estimated that '95 per cent' of the content on the site is explicit

OnlyFans creator Leah Schrager, who performs under the name Ona Artist, has revealed she makes $60,000 a month on the platform as she estimated that ’95 per cent’ of the content on the site is explicit

Ms Schrager spoke to the BBC's Evan Davis on Radio 4's PM programme on Wednesday after OnlyFans dropped plans to ban sexually explicit photographs and videos on its platform later this year

Ms Schrager spoke to the BBC’s Evan Davis on Radio 4’s PM programme on Wednesday after OnlyFans dropped plans to ban sexually explicit photographs and videos on its platform later this year

The online subscription service had said last Thursday that new rules coming into effect in October would prohibit ‘any content containing sexually explicit conduct’, although non-sexual nudity would still be permitted.

But in a surprise move today, the London-based company reversed the decision hours after chief executive Tim Stokely claimed the change was prompted by ‘unfair’ banks who were concerned about ‘reputational risk’.